Second petition begins to investigate South Korean President Moon Jae-In’s bitcoin payment to North Korea

Another petition has been posted on South Korea’s government website regarding Moon Jae-In illegal payment to North Korea via bitcoin despite UN sanctions in 2018

On February 1st 2018, a petition was posted on South Korea’s government website demanding an action on a professor named Kim Jung Min who has been claiming that Presient Moon Jae-In and his people have been using bitcoin as a way to send illegal money to North Korea to help purchase parts of nuclear weapons that were destroyed in the 풍계리 Nuclear sites on September 9, 2017. Despite the intent of the petition to deny Professor Kim Jung Min’s claim regarding President Moon Jae-In’s illegal bitcoin usage, many participants of the petition disagree with the petitioner’s stance on the case and wants the case to be investigated.

First petition posted on January 31, 2018

 

On February 1st 2018, another petition was posted to investigate Moon Jae-In’s bitcoin usage. In the second petition, the petitioner demands an investigation on Moon’s bitcoin usage for his payments to North Korea and China’s One belt One road Project. The petitioner even goes as far as to demand to reveal the account used in South Korean banks in New York as well as CLS account which has records of payment from South Korea to abroad.

Second petition was posted just one day after the first petition

In mid January, New York State Department of Financial Services (NYDFS) has asked South Korea’s Financial Supervisory Service (FSS) and Financial Intelligence Unit (FIU) to share the crypto trading data obtained from their inspections of six major Korean banks. Amid many speculations about President Moon’s bitcoin usages,  The most popular theory is that President Moon Jae-In indeed used bitcoin to finance North Korea. If the investigation proves the professor’s claim regarding the case, it is very unclear what will happen to President Moon Jae-In personally and his regime itself.

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